FAST-US-7 Folklore and Folk Humor Reference
Examples of 'Knock-Knock' Jokes
FAST-US-7 United States Popular Culture (Hopkins)
Department of Translation Studies, University of Tampere


Along with Confucious jokes, "Knock-Knock" jokes are one of the most common juvenile humor forms in English. While common in Britain and the U.S., as the jokes are based on English word-play and puns, they are seldom heard outside native English environments. To some extent Knock-Knock jokes can be sources of information on the cultural references, brand names, etc., assumed to be "known" within a given culture. Compare the British jokes at the end with the American ones for likely 'transferability' to the other culture or variety of English.

American English Knock-Knock Jokes

    Knock, knock!
    Who's there?
    B-4.
    B-4 who?
    B-4 I freeze to death, please open this door!

    Knock, knock!
    Who's there?
    Wendy.
    Wendy who?
    Wendy today. Sunny tomorrow

    Knock, knock!
    Who's there?
    Bisquick
    Bisquick who?
    Bisquick, your pants are on fire

    Knock, Knock.
    Who's there?
    Chimney.
    Chimney who?
    Chimney cricket! Have you seen Pinocchio?

    Knock, knock
    Who's there?
    Aesop!
    Aesop who?
    Aesop I saw a puddy cat!

    Knock, knock
    Who's there?
    A Fred!
    A Fred who?
    Who's a Fred of the Big Bad Wolf ?


British English Knock-Knock Jokes

    Knock, knock
    Who's there?
    Macon
    Macon who?
    Have you got your Macon? It's raining out here

    Knock, knock
    Who's there?
    Eureka
    Eureka who?
    Eureka something, and it really pongs

    Knock, knock
    Who's there?
    Kenya
    Kenya who?
    Kenya think of anything that's more fun than geography?

    Knock, knock
    Who's there?
    Nicosia
    Nicosia who?
    Clothing for sale. Buy your socks and Nicosia


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Last Updated 09 February 2010